Juvenile Delinquency

Chapter Two - Assignment Three

Scenario A

Question1

The situation that Shatiek finds himself in is a sad and unfortunate one. However, as a juvenile judge I would treat him as a minor. Having considered all the available evidence and information, it is clear that the young man has been influenced by the society.

Crime and drugs are all he knows about. The young man has never had the opportunity in his short life to try and be anybody else other than that. The courts should provide the young man with this opportunity. I would place him in a youth facility for a prolonged stay to help him.

Question 2

A 16-year-old like Shatiek may or may not deserve a second chance. It is determined by the evidence and information adduced in court concerning the particular young 16 old.

Question 3

Shatieks's behavior is very much common among adolescent boys especially in the low-end areas and estates. Young boys are introduced very early in their lives into crime, drugs and firearms.

Scenario B

Question 1

The children should be prosecuted in a juvenile court. They should be locked up in a youth facility for a period. The service would allow them realize the seriousness of their actions. It would arrest this deviant behavior before is spills out of control.

Question 2

There is sufficient evidence to justify crimes among the participants of the sex ring. Whatever missing evidence or piece of information there is can easily be investigated by the law enforcement officers.

Question 3

It is paramount that the participants be punished for their activities. In an addition, they should undergo counseling to share their thoughts and feelings on the issue. Parents and guardians are also advised to pay more attention to their children and to what they may be up to. Serious crimes may be being committed right under their noses.

Chapter Two - Assignment Four

Question 1

Yes, each of the scenarios can result in an adjudication of delinquency by a juvenile court judge. The reason is that each situation involves minors. The minors in each case are the perpetrators of at least one crime. A juvenile court judge under usual and ordinary circumstances has jurisdiction over such matters.

Question 2

The scenarios explained in the question are not of equivalent seriousness. Scenario 1 is not that severe as the suspect causes little or no harm to the society. The result of scenario 1 is charges being dropped. Scenario two is far-reaching as the impact the suspects have on the society is massive. They cause death, destruction of property and accident. The result is murder charges being leveled against the suspects.

Question 3

I do not think that each of the scenarios should be handled by the juvenile court. Scene one should be dealt with by the juvenile court as the offense in question is not dangerous. The second scenario, however, should not be handled by a children's court. Scenario three should be handled by a minor court as the delinquents are young and non-repeat offenders.

Question 4

Scenario two should not be dealt with by a minor court. The court should waive and transfer the suspects to and adult justice system. The reason behind this is that the offenses committed in this scenario are far-reaching. An elderly woman is dead, a vehicle has been stolen and an accident caused. The sequence of events portrays prior planning and execution of that plan.

Question 5

The suspects are very dangerous to the society and should be adjudicated in an adult court. As a juvenile judge, I would punish the young suspect incommensurate with the crime committed, and the legislation contravened. The aim is to make the youth understand the seriousness of his or actions. The juvenile should also understand that the society has no room for deviant behavior. The overriding objective is to rehabilitate and reform the suspect.

Chapter Two - Assignment Five

Question 1

A youthful chronic offender is a juvenile aged 11 years or younger who has been convicted ten times in their young years for a broad range of crimes and has been arrested within a twelve-month period. It may also involve minors who are between twelve and fifteen years of age and have committed several crimes within a period of eighteen months. Such delinquents are accountable for most of the severe crimes committed by juveniles.

Question 2

The primary cause of chronic youth offenders is the juvenile's early introduction to crime or violence. The juvenile can have persistent contact with the law enforcement officers until it no longer scares him or her. The juveniles who are lingering youth reprobates are also probably to have mental health problems. These are branded by approaches of loneliness, social loneliness, and emotional uncertainty. They may also have been fatalities of crime and ferocity themselves in their earlier life.

Question 3

Research has shown that the arrest and adjudication of this group in the juvenile courts have little or no effect. The youthful chronic offenders are more probable than not likely to get worse with arrest and conviction. Special measures are required to deal with this group of young persistent offenders.

Question 4

The first step in dealing with the group is to understand the group. It is paramount to understand why a particular juvenile is a chronic youth offender. It is also important to talk to them and counsel them. Adjudication and conviction are not enough to rehabilitate the offenders. It is crucial to put in place follow-up mechanisms check on the progress of the offenders once they are out of youth facilities. The points discussed above are the policy changes I would implement and make recommendations on.